Vasyl Lomachenko is not worried about facing a more experienced fighter
Nov 11 2014 9:55 PM
{loadposition aboveComponent}

WBO featherweight champion Vasyl Lomachenko (2-1-0, 1 KO) will defend his title against Chonlatarn Piriyapinyo (52-1-0, 33 KO's), November 22 as part of the #PacquiaoAlgieri event in Macao, China.

Comment on this video

deepwater2 says:

This might be the most exciting boxer to come around in a long time. Out with the old and in with the new.

Radam G says:

Wow! V-Lo came off dismissive and kind of surly about this opponent. He can do that. He's one bad dude with mountains of confidence. Holla!

stormcentre says:

Previously when we discussed whether Lomachenko would fight/beat Rigo, I leaned towards Rigo as a result of being intoxicated with his skills.

But the other day I was talking to a guy that has seen a few of Rigo's fights and he said that after 5 rounds – if Rigo hasn't won the fight conclusively and is ahead on points – he can fall into a habit of playing it out like an amateur fight.

I then watched a few of Rigo's 10 and/or 12 round fights, including that with Cordoba (spelling?), and noticed that what I was told was not a bad observation.

Given that consideration, it may mean that Lomachenko has more potential to win such a matchup than previously thought.

Particularly if Rigo remains as inactive as he has been.

The Shadow says:

[QUOTE=stormcentre;69483]Previously when we discussed whether Lomachenko would fight/beat Rigo, I leaned towards Rigo as a result of being intoxicated with his skills.

But the other day I was talking to a guy that has seen a few of Rigo's fights and he said that after 5 rounds – if Rigo hasn't won the fight conclusively and is ahead on points – he can fall into a habit of playing it out like an amateur fight.

I then watched a few of Rigo's 10 and/or 12 round fights, including that with Cordoba (spelling?), and noticed that what I was told was not a bad observation.

Given that consideration, it may mean that Lomachenko has more potential to win such a matchup than previously thought.

Particularly if Rigo remains as inactive as he has been.[/QUOTE]

That's true, Storm. But that Cordoba fight came earlier in his career before he was used to going 12 rounds. He had to mentally get adjusted and convince himself that he could go 12 after 500 fights going four or less.

It was simply instinct that took over and he started that Cuban school salsa, dancing all over the ring.

But he's a master adjuster on every level. He fired his trainer after the fight. If you notice, he was trying to follow the coach's advice about not fighting his fight and engaging more.

He didn't like it because he got hit a few times on the inside trying to listen to the coach.

If you notice, after that fight, every 12 rounder since then has been a breeze for him.

His observation wasn't bad at all but he's addressed that flaw since then. It was a mental thing more than anything.

stormcentre says:

[QUOTE=The Shadow;69497]That's true, Storm. But that Cordoba fight came earlier in his career before he was used to going 12 rounds. He had to mentally get adjusted and convince himself that he could go 12 after 500 fights going four or less.

It was simply instinct that took over and he started that Cuban school salsa, dancing all over the ring.

But he's a master adjuster on every level. He fired his trainer after the fight. If you notice, he was trying to follow the coach's advice about not fighting his fight and engaging more.

He didn't like it because he got hit a few times on the inside trying to listen to the coach.

If you notice, after that fight, every 12 rounder since then has been a breeze for him.

His observation wasn't bad at all but he's addressed that flaw since then. It was a mental thing more than anything.[/QUOTE]

Wasn't his coach Ronnie Shields for the Cordoba fight?

I thought Shields was trying to tell Rigo to do more in the last half of the fight?

But yes, there has been an improvement in activity in the latter rounds of some of Rigo's fights.

I wonder if Lomanchenko is better than Donaire to a greater extent than Rigo was/is.

Radam G says:

[QUOTE=stormcentre;69561]Wasn't his coach Ronnie Shields for the Cordoba fight?

I thought Shields was trying to tell Rigo to do more in the last half of the fight?

But yes, there has been an improvement in activity in the latter rounds of some of Rigo's fights.

I wonder if Lomanchenko is better than Donaire to a greater extent than Rigo was/is.[/QUOTE]

YUP! It was trainer Ronnie Shields.

Cuban Willie Rigo and Ronnie had chemistry clashing problem. Holla!

oubobcat says:

I think this is going to be a good showcase for Lomachenko. Oddly, this is a step down for him in his fourth professional fight coming off the Salido and Russell fights.

I am expecting him to get another showcase type fight in the spring on a card with Nicolas Walters and then those two to be matched later in the year in what will be a very good matchup.

As for a Rigo fight, I think at this point of their respective careers the edge goes to Rigo. Rigo is just such a masterful fighter and I think just slicker and better defensively than Lomachenko. I think it'd be the ultimate chess match with Rigo scoring just a little more each round and edging out the majority of rounds. Honestly, not particularly a fight I'd want to see. I'd rather see Rigo fight the likes of Santa Cruz and Mares (more interesting fights to me based on their styles) and Lomachenko the likes of Walters/Gradovich. But in a hypothetical match, Rigo would win in my opinion.