Kevin Iole and Mickey Bey give their prediction on Mayweather vs. Maidana
Sep 07 2014 2:16 AM
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Al Bernstein chats with Yahoo!Sports' Kevin Iole and Lightweight contender Mickey Bey about the upcoming rematch between Floyd Mayweather and Marcos Maidana. Mayweather vs. Maidana takes places September 13 at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas.

Comment on this video

Radam G says:

Kevin I is full of it. And has always been riding on Money May's small ___ ______.

Of course Chino fought dirty. And so did — and he always does — Money May. Call it a part of the sleaze factor of da game. As in Bout I, Bout II will be roughly the same.

Money May is an arch master of inadvertent elbows upside da dome, knee-to-knee bumping, glove rubbing in the mug, fore arming to the throat, stiff arming while toe stepping and ankle tripping, and thumbing to da mug's peep holes off his kangaroo hooking.

Don't take my words for it. Holla at some videos of Money May's last nine or 10 bouts. He is no saint of clean fighting. Matter of fact, he is the dean and demon of dirty fighting. And it is not a knock on him. He's not a darn referee. He's a great prizefighter who takes advantage of all that he can. The heck if he cannot so-called read. He is one smart man.

Of our sport, Money May is controlling the whole nine. He has a genius mind and a boksing gold mine. I ain't got nuthin' but luv fo' him. But I'll always call a spade a spade. And I never hide in the shade. Just in plain sight. Where people are blinded by the light. Holla!

Chris L says:

I think Garcia & co may have the tactics slightly wrong in this fight, from what I'm seeing in the media and on all access they believe that the reason that they lost is because of Chino's conditioning so that is the main thing that they are looking to improve in the upcoming fight whilst keeping the base tactics the same.

Whereas this was partly the reason the main thing was that Floyd worked Chino out, better conditioning or not, you can't deny that by the second half of the fight Floyd was in control. He now knows how to handle Maidana and coming in with the same style won't work even if his conditioning is that much better. I believe that to beat Floyd you have to be prepared to fight two different fights, one in the first half and then switch up the strategy dramatically once he begins to work that style out.

I know this was venturing off the topic of the video slightly, but it was a thought that I had and wanted to share.

stormcentre says:

[QUOTE=Chris L;63321]I think Garcia & co may have the tactics slightly wrong in this fight, from what I'm seeing in the media and on all access they believe that the reason that they lost is because of Chino's conditioning so that is the main thing that they are looking to improve in the upcoming fight whilst keeping the base tactics the same.

Whereas this was partly the reason the main thing was that Floyd worked Chino out, better conditioning or not, you can't deny that by the second half of the fight Floyd was in control. He now knows how to handle Maidana and coming in with the same style won't work even if his conditioning is that much better. I believe that to beat Floyd you have to be prepared to fight two different fights, one in the first half and then switch up the strategy dramatically once he begins to work that style out.

I know this was venturing off the topic of the video slightly, but it was a thought that I had and wanted to share.[/QUOTE]

It's a good and valid point Chris.

What's Chino going to do different this time?

Hell, his trainer can't even publicly isolate a few of the things that Floyd does that may be able to be capitalised on, and Robert knows his stuff.

Bottom line; Maidana doesn't have what it takes to beat a guy like Floyd.

The starting point is you have to stop him moving around so much, make him exchange and/or undo that defence of his.

Power, durability, experience and stamina alone usually don't do that to guys that are as skilled as Floyd; unless they grow old, get gassed and/or are distracted.

The Commish says:

I can see and understand why so many in the boxing crowd are picking $$$May–not just to win–but to win the rematch in easier fashion.

Trainer Robert Garcia believes ZMaidana could have been in better condition, so they are working even harder in a longer training camp. I believe Maidana will indeed be in great shape, but will he–can he–get into better shape?

Every person is a machine, capable of just so much. Prior to the last fight, we were told by Garcia–he was even on my show one week before the fight–saying that no fighter he's ever worked with has ever been in better shape. He told me how Maidana would set a pace no opponent could stay with, not for every second of 12 rounds.

Well, for six rounds, Maidana did indeed set a brutal pace. Then, as with all machines, he began to slow down. He had “maxed” out. As he did, the amazingly-conditioned $$$May, who had been more on the defensive than on the offense, began to pick up the pace.

Body shots began to land on Maidana. Combinations started coming his way. As he began to work more on defense, his offensive output began to slow down. No longer was he tossing 100+ punches per round, a rate so ridiculous that it's almost inhuman. The legendary Henry Armstrong probably threw more punches per round and per fight than any champion in history, and even he didn't approach the 100+ figure per round.

The kind of work rate is like a world-class sprinter, who is used to showing us bursts of speed over short distances, going out and trying to shatter the world record in the mile by sprinting it at his fastest pace. When the race begins, he explodes into the lead. He pulls away. 100 yards. 200 yards. 500 yards. He is blowing everybody away, setting a pace that nobody else can sustain. If he keeps this up, he will run the mile in close to a world record-shattering three minutes. Then, because what he is doing is virtually impossible to keepp doing for any human, he gasses. He begins to slow. The other runs don't break stride. They stay on their nearly-minute per mile pace. Soon, they pass the sprinter. Then, the race is over. The winner finishes in 4:09:22. A few others finish a second or two behind him. Our sprinter? He finishes in 4:32. Still respectable, but out of the money. He sacrificed stamina for speed, and for nearly half the race, he made us wonder, “Can he really do it?” He couldn't. Nobody can. A human can give only so much.

Chino gave all he could in the first six rounds to knock out $$$May. $$$May did all he could to keep that from happening. It took Chino much more energy trying for the knockout and to slow $$$May down than it took a relaxed, skilled and well-conditioned $$$May to prevent himself from being KO'd.

When Chino finally began to breathe harder, when he finally began to hit his “oxygen debt,” $$$May went to work.

I understand why Kevin Iole and Mickey Bey are picking $$$May.

They see $$$May as the long-distance runner.

They see Maidana as the sprinter.

-Randy G.

amayseng says:

[QUOTE=The Commish;63362]I can see and understand why so many in the boxing crowd are picking $$$May–not just to win–but to win the rematch in easier fashion.

Trainer Robert Garcia believes ZMaidana could have been in better condition, so they are working even harder in a longer training camp. I believe Maidana will indeed be in great shape, but will he–can he–get into better shape?

Every person is a machine, capable of just so much. Prior to the last fight, we were told by Garcia–he was even on my show one week before the fight–saying that no fighter he's ever worked with has ever been in better shape. He told me how Maidana would set a pace no opponent could stay with, not for every second of 12 rounds.

Well, for six rounds, Maidana did indeed set a brutal pace. Then, as with all machines, he began to slow down. He had “maxed” out. As he did, the amazingly-conditioned $$$May, who had been more on the defensive than on the offense, began to pick up the pace.

Body shots began to land on Maidana. Combinations started coming his way. As he began to work more on defense, his offensive output began to slow down. No longer was he tossing 100+ punches per round, a rate so ridiculous that it's almost inhuman. The legendary Henry Armstrong probably threw more punches per round and per fight than any champion in history, and even he didn't approach the 100+ figure per round.

The kind of work rate is like a world-class sprinter, who is used to showing us bursts of speed over short distances, going out and trying to shatter the world record in the mile by sprinting it at his fastest pace. When the race begins, he explodes into the lead. He pulls away. 100 yards. 200 yards. 500 yards. He is blowing everybody away, setting a pace that nobody else can sustain. If he keeps this up, he will run the mile in close to a world record-shattering three minutes. Then, because what he is doing is virtually impossible to keepp doing for any human, he gasses. He begins to slow. The other runs don't break stride. They stay on their nearly-minute per mile pace. Soon, they pass the sprinter. Then, the race is over. The winner finishes in 4:09:22. A few others finish a second or two behind him. Our sprinter? He finishes in 4:32. Still respectable, but out of the money. He sacrificed stamina for speed, and for nearly half the race, he made us wonder, “Can he really do it?” He couldn't. Nobody can. A human can give only so much.

Chino gave all he could in the first six rounds to knock out $$$May. $$$May did all he could to keep that from happening. It took Chino much more energy trying for the knockout and to slow $$$May down than it took a relaxed, skilled and well-conditioned $$$May to prevent himself from being KO'd.

When Chino finally began to breathe harder, when he finally began to hit his “oxygen debt,” $$$May went to work.

I understand why Kevin Iole and Mickey Bey are picking $$$May.

They see $$$May as the long-distance runner.

They see Maidana as the sprinter.

-Randy G.[/QUOTE]

I agree…The adjustment for Chino should be for him to mix up his punches like a pitcher mixes up his pitches…You cant throw fastballs all out and have any energy for the last half of the fight..

Chino needs to change up his speed and power on his shots and work the body more than floyds head the first six rounds.

The Shadow says:

[QUOTE=The Commish;63362]I can see and understand why so many in the boxing crowd are picking $$$May–not just to win–but to win the rematch in easier fashion.

Trainer Robert Garcia believes ZMaidana could have been in better condition, so they are working even harder in a longer training camp. I believe Maidana will indeed be in great shape, but will he–can he–get into better shape?

Every person is a machine, capable of just so much. Prior to the last fight, we were told by Garcia–he was even on my show one week before the fight–saying that no fighter he's ever worked with has ever been in better shape. He told me how Maidana would set a pace no opponent could stay with, not for every second of 12 rounds.

Well, for six rounds, Maidana did indeed set a brutal pace. Then, as with all machines, he began to slow down. He had “maxed” out. As he did, the amazingly-conditioned $$$May, who had been more on the defensive than on the offense, began to pick up the pace.

Body shots began to land on Maidana. Combinations started coming his way. As he began to work more on defense, his offensive output began to slow down. No longer was he tossing 100+ punches per round, a rate so ridiculous that it's almost inhuman. The legendary Henry Armstrong probably threw more punches per round and per fight than any champion in history, and even he didn't approach the 100+ figure per round.

The kind of work rate is like a world-class sprinter, who is used to showing us bursts of speed over short distances, going out and trying to shatter the world record in the mile by sprinting it at his fastest pace. When the race begins, he explodes into the lead. He pulls away. 100 yards. 200 yards. 500 yards. He is blowing everybody away, setting a pace that nobody else can sustain. If he keeps this up, he will run the mile in close to a world record-shattering three minutes. Then, because what he is doing is virtually impossible to keepp doing for any human, he gasses. He begins to slow. The other runs don't break stride. They stay on their nearly-minute per mile pace. Soon, they pass the sprinter. Then, the race is over. The winner finishes in 4:09:22. A few others finish a second or two behind him. Our sprinter? He finishes in 4:32. Still respectable, but out of the money. He sacrificed stamina for speed, and for nearly half the race, he made us wonder, “Can he really do it?” He couldn't. Nobody can. A human can give only so much.

Chino gave all he could in the first six rounds to knock out $$$May. $$$May did all he could to keep that from happening. It took Chino much more energy trying for the knockout and to slow $$$May down than it took a relaxed, skilled and well-conditioned $$$May to prevent himself from being KO'd.

When Chino finally began to breathe harder, when he finally began to hit his “oxygen debt,” $$$May went to work.

I understand why Kevin Iole and Mickey Bey are picking $$$May.

They see $$$May as the long-distance runner.

They see Maidana as the sprinter.

-Randy G.[/QUOTE]

Excellent analogy. This is a point we've been making on the show — Channel 92, SiriusXM — as well as in these here parts: it is impossible to be in better shape.

Everything else they're saying is just a meager attempt at self-hypnosis and New Age positive self talk. “I can, I can, I can…”

Sure, you can, Rob.

If he fights harder, he's just gonna crash harder. That simple.

Mayweather will punch him while he's breathing and expedite the gassing process that much more, hit him with deadly body shots in close.

I'm not going to beat it to death but it is impossible for him to be in better condition. It's not going to happen.

He can try to sprint all he wants but unless he can turn this long distance sport into a 200 meter dash — which I guess is plausible in theory, he has the punch to do so — then he has a shot.

But they would be much better off trying to solve the riddle of Mayweather's venomous jab to the body. He's going to get ripped to the body, that much is inevitable.

But the jab to the body is the punch that will weaken you while you don't expect to get weakened.

It's like the bite of a black mamba, both in execution and impact. It's swift, it's sudden and it's deadly — and will slowly sap you of all strength.

Just like the venom spreads throughout the body before neutralizing the effects of your vital organs, that jab single-handedly does the same thing.

He tried to time it and counter it with uppercuts, hooks and overhand rights but he found it impossible to time. If he can make that adjustment, Maidana has a much better shot.

But then, what counter adjustment does Mayweather then make?

He's a tricky bastard. And very, very dangerous.