Amir Khan “I'm not making mistakes in this fight, I'll do what I do best”
Dec 11 2014 10:34 PM
{loadposition aboveComponent}

Former world champion and current WBC Silver welterweight champion Amir Khan (29-3, 19 KO's) is ready to face former world champion Devon Alexander (26-2, 14 KO's)

Khan's December 13, 2014 fight against former World Champion Devon Alexander at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada which will be televised live on on SHOWTIME CHAMPIONSHIP BOXING®.

#KhanAlexander Keys to Victory: http://bit.ly/1z8zyVV

#KhanAlexander Fight Facts: http://www.boxingchannel.tv/khanvsalexander

Comment on this video

Radam G says:

Wow! Amir says that he will make no mistakes. I want to see that, because no has ever had pure perfection in any gone more than three rounds. The Willies came close in q fight or two. Holla!

deepwater2 says:

[QUOTE=BoxingChannel.tv;71917][url=http://boxingchannel.tv/amir-khan-im-not-making-mistakes-in-this-fight-ill-do-what-i-do-best][/QUOTE]

He is already making many mistakes before the fight. He is talking about Floyd way too much again. He pulled out of this fight last time because of Floyd, and here he is again talking about Floyd this and Floyd that.He is saying he wants to win in a style so that the fans will say,”wow he should fight Floyd!”.I hope that Floyd skips him even if he wins.

I expect Khan to box and move his way to a boring win but Khan better be thinking about Devon's big forehead coming right for his face. If Khan losses he will be banned from saying the name Floyd ever again.

Skibbz says:

It's infatuation. He yearns to be everything be where Floyd is, there's no shame in that but this is a sport of action, words don't do much if you can't pull yourself up the ladder.

He's said he won't make mistakes, we've said he can be a tough champion to beat if he uses his brain instead of getting it rattled.. But he's yet to have a fight against a tough opponent who he's put away decisively. Let's see if 147 is the right fit.

The Shadow says:

[QUOTE=Radam G;71927]Wow! Amir says that he will make no mistakes. I want to see that, because no has ever had pure perfection in any gone more than three rounds. The Willies came close in q fight or two. Holla![/QUOTE]

Pep, Pastrano and Rigondeaux?

You can add PBF against Corrales. Also, Andre Ward vs. Dawson (though Dawson was totally debilitated)?

Amir, on the other hand, is a flawed fighter.

Here's the thing many don't realize in boxing and life as well. You can improve, sure. But this is sports, at the highest level and a lethal sport at that.

Amir Khan's veteran skill game, inside fighting, control, etc. was non-existent.

Because he hasn't been taught this since young — unlike Floyd Mayweather, Andre Ward and Bernard Hopkins — he hasn't had an opportunity to accumulate the 10,000 hours of practice necessary to develop muscle memory of mastery of these skills.

Granted, he may have [I]some[/I] inside game now, for instance. But his potential ceiling in this area is “average,” at best.

Now, he may delude himself by seeing this immense progress he will have made — and, invariably, greatest amount of progress is made initially as you acquire a new skill. Mastering it is a WHOLE different ballgame.

(Not to mention, Khan's idea of a “ballgame” is flicking his pecker on Skype.)

So due to his immense progress in a field where no skill previously existed, Khan may now expose himself to situations, thinking he's good at something when in reality his can only be average, at best.

This is dangerous.

(For reference, peep Carl Froch's utter bewilderment at in-close fighting tactics against Andre Ward. He's tried to address this flaw since but he will never be more than 50% of Ward's ability here and that's in a best case scenario.)

This is like trying to turn basketball player Allen Iverson into an effective post-player. He's never been taught in it.

Due to his life-long basketball experience, he will undoubtedly pick up a few tricks and could likely dominate amateurs with his newfound knowledge.

But if he were to try and post up a professional player who's accumulated the 10,000 hours of practice required to obtain MASTERY, ie. a Gary Payton — a point guard with legendary post game — or, God forbid, an actual post player, he'd get smacked silly.

Khan, should he ever face Mayweather, intoxicated from his progress in the “finer nuances of boxing,” as Virgil Hunter calls it, will try his new Bruce Lee principles and think he will be successful.

I peeped Khan shadowboxing. This will often reveal what a guy is working on for an upcoming bout. I saw Khan drilling and executing pull-back moves, hiding behind the “shield,” lurking behind the shoulder, stiff-arms, control tactics and so forth.

And guess what. When he was doing his fast combinations-pivot out, he looked completely natural. This is what he does, after all.

But when he tried to slow down, sure, he showed new things in his arsenal. But he didn't look as comfortable/natural doing it.

“Amir Khan is not as explosive as he was,” award-winning analyst Paulie Malignaggi has said of Khan's new style.

While he was flawed when he was reckless, Malignaggi pointed out that slowing him down may be detrimental. “When you slow him down, you also bring out more flaws in Amir.”

Alexander, as we saw against Tim Bradley, is not the best rough-house fighter on the inside.

So Khan will likely try those same tactics in spots, wrestle the smaller Alexander around on the inside and he might just have some success!

Unfortunately, this might intoxicate (delude) him even further.

Ultimately, should Khan win this Saturday and land Mayweather in the spring, Khan will try to implement Hunter's wing chun teachings (the same stuff that make Hopkins and Ward elite), and seek to succeed with it against Mayweather, a SUPREME martial artist and arguably the best inside fighter in boxing.

Mayweather MASTERS all that martial art, leverage sh*t Hunter is trying to pass on to Khan.

(I saw Canelo try one of those “nuance” tricks on Mayweather. He just instantly responded by pulling off some Sensei sh*t, tricking [URL=”http://youtu.be/ThoKpCEFASE?t=1m47s”>Canelo into a flush right hand[/URL]. So much for that bullshit. LOL.)

Even though he's exceptionally strong for his size, Mayweather's mastery of leverage in close is one of the basic reasons Mayweather can even attempt walking guys down and outwrestle guys who outweigh him by two weight classes.

Additionally, I've seen Floyd close range with feints and pivots that Amir Khan couldn't even conceive.

This fight will answer A LOT of questions about Amir Khan, Virgil Hunter and his philosophy of fighting.

Yes, Khan's in-ring mistakes may be limited. But this tactical adjustment/wrinkle will be the biggest mistake of them all — especially if he has success and fools himself into thinking he can try this sh*t with Mayweather.

Unless, Hunter has found a way to circumvent the 10,000 hours of practice required to obtain mastery of one skill. Which, of course, will have made Hunter a genius.

Skibbz says:

Shadow who are you to pass these judgements? Sometimes I'm unsure whether you're a comedic writer or serious, this time I'm leaning towards comedy. You talk sometimes that makes boxing sound like a computer game, then you mention some utter b*llocks about wing chun and go on to pass on more uninformed judgement on a subject you have amateur knowledge of at best.

I'm not knocking you for your lack of knowledge, but if you're going to put a fighter down at least know what you're talking about. Have an opinion that has been informed through your own trials, rather than viewing it from behind a screen and thinking you have a clue as to what's going on.

Furthermore you're quoting Paulie?!? That says it all doesn't it? You tapped out a block of BS!

Radam G says:

[QUOTE=The Shadow;71953]Pep, Pastrano and Rigondeaux?

You can add PBF against Corrales. Also, Andre Ward vs. Dawson (though Dawson was totally debilitated)?

Amir, on the other hand, is a flawed fighter.

Here's the thing many don't realize in boxing and life as well. You can improve, sure. But this is sports, at the highest level and a lethal sport at that.

Amir Khan's veteran skill game, inside fighting, control, etc. was non-existent.

Because he hasn't been taught this since young — unlike Floyd Mayweather, Andre Ward and Bernard Hopkins — he hasn't had an opportunity to accumulate the 10,000 hours of practice necessary to develop muscle memory of mastery of these skills.

Granted, he may have [I]some[/I] inside game now, for instance. But his potential ceiling in this area is “average,” at best.

Now, he may delude himself by seeing this immense progress he will have made — and, invariably, greatest amount of progress is made initially as you acquire a new skill. Mastering it is a WHOLE different ballgame.

(Not to mention, Khan's idea of a “ballgame” is flicking his pecker on Skype.)

So due to his immense progress in a field where no skill previously existed, Khan may now expose himself to situations, thinking he's good at something when in reality his can only be average, at best.

This is dangerous.

(For reference, peep Carl Froch's utter bewilderment at in-close fighting tactics against Andre Ward. He's tried to address this flaw since but he will never be more than 50% of Ward's ability here and that's in a best case scenario.)

This is like trying to turn basketball player Allen Iverson into an effective post-player. He's never been taught in it.

Due to his life-long basketball experience, he will undoubtedly pick up a few tricks and could likely dominate amateurs with his newfound knowledge.

But if he were to try and post up a professional player who's accumulated the 10,000 hours of practice required to obtain MASTERY, ie. a Gary Payton — a point guard with legendary post game — or, God forbid, an actual post player, he'd get smacked silly.

Khan, should he ever face Mayweather, intoxicated from his progress in the “finer nuances of boxing,” as Virgil Hunter calls it, will try his new Bruce Lee principles and think he will be successful.

I peeped Khan shadowboxing. This will often reveal what a guy is working on for an upcoming bout. I saw Khan drilling and executing pull-back moves, hiding behind the “shield,” lurking behind the shoulder, stiff-arms, control tactics and so forth.

And guess what. When he was doing his fast combinations-pivot out, he looked completely natural. This is what he does, after all.

But when he tried to slow down, sure, he showed new things in his arsenal. But he didn't look as comfortable/natural doing it.

“Amir Khan is not as explosive as he was,” award-winning analyst Paulie Malignaggi has said of Khan's new style.

While he was flawed when he was reckless, Malignaggi pointed out that slowing him down may be detrimental. “When you slow him down, you also bring out more flaws in Amir.”

Alexander, as we saw against Tim Bradley, is not the best rough-house fighter on the inside.

So Khan will likely try those same tactics in spots, wrestle the smaller Alexander around on the inside and he might just have some success!

Unfortunately, this might intoxicate (delude) him even further.

Ultimately, should Khan win this Saturday and land Mayweather in the spring, Khan will try to implement Hunter's wing chun teachings (the same stuff that make Hopkins and Ward elite), and seek to succeed with it against Mayweather, a SUPREME martial artist and arguably the best inside fighter in boxing.

Mayweather MASTERS all that martial art, leverage sh*t Hunter is trying to pass on to Khan.

(I saw Canelo try one of those “nuance” tricks on Mayweather. He just instantly responded by pulling off some Sensei sh*t, tricking [URL=”http://youtu.be/ThoKpCEFASE?t=1m47s”>Canelo into a flush right hand[/URL]. So much for that bullshit. LOL.)

Even though he's exceptionally strong for his size, Mayweather's mastery of leverage in close is one of the basic reasons Mayweather can even attempt walking guys down and outwrestle guys who outweigh him by two weight classes.

Additionally, I've seen Floyd close range with feints and pivots that Amir Khan couldn't even conceive.

This fight will answer A LOT of questions about Amir Khan, Virgil Hunter and his philosophy of fighting.

Yes, Khan's in-ring mistakes may be limited. But this tactical adjustment/wrinkle will be the biggest mistake of them all — especially if he has success and fools himself into thinking he can try this sh*t with Mayweather.

Unless, Hunter has found a way to circumvent the 10,000 hours of practice required to obtain mastery of one skill. Which, of course, will have made Hunter a genius.[/QUOTE]

YUP! Those three Willies would be ones. Holla!

oubobcat says:

Amongst other reasons I think Khan is getting ko'd tonight, one is that his focus is not on Alexander. It is on Mayweather and getting that fight.

I think Khan is concerned that even with a win he will be passed up again as a Mayweather foe and the big payday he yearns for from that fight. We are hearing rumors of Pacquiao negotiations for Mayweather though I am not holding my breathe on that. But its out there and Khan is hearing that too. Thurman has been calling out Mayweather at some of these press conferences and Khan may be getting concerned the much more charismatic Thurman may get the money shot. And who knows but Cotto-Canelo is not finalized and maybe Floyd and Showtime are able to swoop in to make Mayweather-Cotto instead.

So Khan has once again begun his own marketing campaign in full force to get his money ticket against Mayweather. I mean really laying out his case in the media. He seems much more focused on Mayweather at this time than his upcoming fight with Alexander. And that is not a good thing against a very skilled quick southpaw in Alexander.

Alexander by mid round knockout over Khan.

RDXSports says:

Yes! And he didn't made any mistake. He completely dominated and outclassed Alexander throughout the whole match.